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21 Princes Street, Kensington, Whangarei, New Zealand

Phone: 09 437 2742

Email: mairtown@nka.org.nz

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Wednesday, 2 May 2012

Ephemeral Art



Today we re-visited the concept of using natural resources to create art with our children (often referred to as ephemeral art or earth art).






Earth art in particular refers to an art form where an artist uses natural resources (twigs, leaves, stones etc) to create original pieces of art and 'ephemeral' art is temporary art created in the environment and designed to naturally erode, therefore only lasting for a short period of time.


The materials we used were carefully chosen for their colour, texture, shape and variety and were displayed in an enticing manner which invited the children to come and discover, manipulate and create. Today we decided upon a selection of beautifully coloured red, brown and yellow autumn leaves, twigs, stones, soft green moss and shells.







Discovering that art can occur by using objects found in nature














Due to its nature ephemeral art is not collected so photographs can be used to capture the essence and character of such creations. In keeping with this theme we did the same today at Kindergarten. The children either took their own pictures (or asked a teacher) and we printed these off for them keep.


Providing children with an organised selection of natural materials for ephemeral art-making is an effective way to encourage children to re-use materials, incorporating the concept of sustainability.


Lisa Terreni  a lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington College of Education, also a practising artist states, “This type of art-making involves design and patterning, creates maths opportunities such as grouping and sorting. Most importantly they can be used to deepen children's learning about the aesthetic qualities of materials, enhance an appreciation of the inherent beauty in the materials, and deepen their respect for these taonga (treasures).”






Aimee's creation comes with a little story "It's a girl walking, they are walking to someones house for a visit, for a tea party".















What fantastic use of the materials available to develop early literacy skills, the letter 'Y'.












Christine

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I was most inspired by this art experience that i observed yesterday. I love the concept of using photography to document the art and then being able to reuse the materials. Very sustainable as well as beautiful.
Sarah (Student).

Chandi Holliman said...

Thank you for sharing this. We do it all the time, I just didnt know there was a name for it. You can see one of the art pieces on my blog this week.
Blessings,
Chandi

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